Tag Archives: Every Kid Outdoors

RELEASE: Senate Committee Passes Bipartisan Legislation to Get Children Outdoors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Contact: April Thomas, 206.321.3850, april.thomas@sierraclub.org


Senate Committee Passes Bipartisan Legislation to Get Children Outdoors

Washington, DC — Today, members of Congress on both sides of the aisle came together to pass the Every Kid Outdoors Act, to help get our kids outdoors. The bill, introduced by Senators Martin Heinrich (D-NM) and Lamar Alexander (R-TN), would encourage fourth graders and their families to visit America’s natural, cultural, and historical treasures. The bill authorizes the Department of the Interior, U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Army Corps of Engineers, to administer a pass program to provide free entry for fourth graders and their families to visit our national public lands, waters, and shores. The companion bill passed the House of Representatives and  is sponsored by Representatives Niki Tsongas (D-MA), Scott Tipton (R-CO), Elise Stefanik (R-NY), and Diana DeGette (D-CO).

In response to the passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act, members of the Outdoors Alliance for Kids issued the following statements:

“The Every Kid Outdoors Act is a powerful way to make it easier for youth to explore our parks and public lands. Exposure to outdoor experiences helps encourage a lifelong sense of adventure and respect for the environment, something we value deeply at The North Face. Together with the Outdoors Alliance for Kids, we’re thrilled to see the legislation pass through the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, helping create opportunity for young people and their families to experience our parks and public lands.” – Arne Arens, President, The North Face

“Alliance for Childhood is enthusiastic about the opportunities the bipartisan Every Kid Outdoors Act will provide for fourth graders and their families. Together with our partners at Outdoors Alliance for Kids, we look forward to working with federal agencies to ensure all children’s healthy development, especially through outdoor, child-directed play in our natural world.” – Linda Rhoads, Executive Director, Alliance for Childhood

“National Park Trust thanks the members of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for their bipartisan support of the Every Kid Outdoors Act which will encourage all 4th grade children and their families to explore and discover our parks, public lands and waters. Only when our children experience the beauty of the great outdoors will they understand the importance of preserving and protecting these treasured places.”  – Grace Lee, Executive Director, National Park Trust

“We applaud Congress for approving the Every Kid Outdoors Act which allows fourth graders and their families to visit our parks, monuments and other public lands at no charge.  This program is part of a vital national effort to break down barriers and connect more young Americans with wild places. Our public lands belong to all of us, and this Act helps kids to visit and discover America’s unique outdoor wonders.”  – Jamie Williams, President, The Wilderness Society

“American Hiking Society applauds the bipartisan passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act by the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. Providing free public lands access to fourth graders across the country will introduce the next generation to outdoor recreation and foster lifelong service to and enjoyment of our most treasured natural resource.” – Kathryn Van Waes, Executive Director, American Hiking Society  

“Every child deserves the opportunity to experience nature and the outdoors through our nation’s parks and open spaces. Thank you to Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for putting us one step closer to making this a reality through the passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act, which we proudly support.” – Barbara Tulipane, CAE, National Recreation and Park Association president and CEO

“Whether a family outing, a school trip or a day at camp, time spent outdoors helps kids develop a sense of belonging in nature and an appreciation of the importance of preserving our lands and water. Our national parks and public lands are unrivaled as spaces where kids can connect with nature and grow their love of the outdoors. We applaud the passage of The Every Kid Outdoors Act which will enable youth-serving organizations like the Y to create powerful community partnerships focused on ensuring all kids, regardless of their circumstances, can experience the wonder of these national treasures.” – Kevin Washington, President and CEO, YMCA of the USA

“We are so pleased that the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources has approved the Every Kid Outdoors Act which will make Every Kid in a Park a permanent program. In its almost three years of existence, this program had opened the door to the natural beauty of the nation’s parks for countless children, helping them to stay physically active and healthy. With the passage of this legislation, the admirable work of this wonderful public-private partnership can continue and provide opportunities for many more kids to savor the great outdoors through our national parks and public lands.” – Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association

“The Trust for Public Land, which creates parks and protects land for people, is grateful for Congress’ support of this vital program, which provides children the opportunity to experience our national treasures, often for the first time. Efforts like the Every Kid Outdoors Act to connect children with nature are critical to ensuring that the next generation will have access to parks and green spaces within a 10-minute walk of home.” – Kathy DeCoster, Vice President and Director of Federal Affairs, The Trust for Public Land

“We enthusiastically support the Every Kid Outdoors Act and believe that connecting children to nature is critically important to their health and well-being, and to the future of our shared outdoor heritage. We commend the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources for putting us one step closer to ensuring that all children have the ability to benefit from nature in our National Parks and in their everyday lives. – Sarah Milligan-Toffler, Executive Director, Children & Nature Network

“Every kid should have access to the physical, emotional and social health benefits of getting outdoors – but today’s kids spend more time indoors than any generation in history. With the passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act, we can begin to overcome some of the structural barriers that keep kids from low-income families and communities of color from having access to outdoor play.  We applaud Congress for its bipartisan leadership on this issue.” – Jackie Ostfeld, Outdoors Director, Sierra Club and Founder and Chair, Outdoors Alliance for Kids

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About the Outdoors Alliance for Kids (OAK): OAK is a national strategic partnership of organizations from diverse sectors with a common interest in connecting children, youth, and families with the outdoors. The members of OAK are brought together by the belief that the wellness of current and future generations, the health of our planet and communities, and the economy of the future depend on humans having a personal, direct, and life-long relationship with nature and the outdoors. OAK brings together nearly 100 businesses and organizations, representing more than 60 million individuals to address the growing divide between children, youth, and the natural world. For more information: www.outdoorsallianceforkids.org

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Release: House Passes Bipartisan Legislation to Get Children Outdoors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Contact: April Thomas, 206.321.3850, april.thomas@sierraclub.org

House Passes Bipartisan Legislation to Get Children Outdoors

Washington, DC — Today, members of Congress on both sides of the aisle came together to pass the Every Kid Outdoors Act, to help get our kids outdoors. The bill, introduced by Representatives Niki Tsongas (D-MA-03), Scott Tipton (R-CO-03), and Diana DeGette (D-CO-01), would encourage fourth graders and their families to visit America’s natural, cultural, and historical treasures. The bill authorizes the Department of the Interior, U.S. Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Army Corps of Engineers, to administer a pass program to provide free entry for fourth graders and their families to visit our national public lands, waters, and shores. The companion bill in the Senate is sponsored by Senators Martin Heinrich (D-NM) and Lamar Alexander (R-TN).

In response to the passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act, members of the Outdoors Alliance for Kids issued the following statements:

“The Every Kid Outdoors Act is a powerful way to make it easier for youth to explore our parks and public lands. Exposure to outdoor experiences helps encourage a lifelong sense of adventure and respect for the environment, something we value deeply at The North Face. Together with the Outdoors Alliance for Kids, we’re thrilled to see the legislation pass, helping create opportunity for young people and their families to experience our parks and public lands.” – Arne Arens, President, The North Face

“Alliance for Childhood is enthusiastic about the opportunities the bipartisan Every Kid Outdoors Act will provide for fourth graders and their families. Together with our partners at Outdoors Alliance for Kids, we look forward to working with federal agencies to ensure all children’s healthy development, especially through outdoor, child-directed play in our natural world.” – Linda Rhoads, Executive Director, Alliance for Childhood

“National Park Trust thanks the members of the House of Representatives for their bipartisan support of the Every Kid Outdoors Act which will encourage all 4th grade children and their families to explore and discover our parks, public lands and waters. Only when our children experience the beauty of the great outdoors will they understand the importance of preserving and protecting these treasured places.”   Grace Lee, Executive Director, National Park Trust

“We applaud Congress for approving the Every Kid Outdoors Act which allows fourth graders and their families to visit our parks, monuments and other public lands at no charge.  This program is part of a vital national effort to break down barriers and connect more young Americans with wild places. Our public lands belong to all of us, and this Act helps kids to visit and discover America’s unique outdoor wonders.”  – Jamie Williams, President, The Wilderness Society

“American Hiking Society applauds the bipartisan passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act by the House of Representatives. Providing free public lands access to fourth graders across the country will introduce the next generation to outdoor recreation and foster lifelong service to and enjoyment of our most treasured natural resource.” – Kathryn Van Waes, Executive Director, American Hiking Society

“Every child deserves the opportunity to experience nature and the outdoors through our nation’s parks and open spaces. Thank you to the U.S. House of Representatives for putting us one step closer to making this a reality through the passage of the Every Kid Outdoors Act, which we proudly support.” – Barbara Tulipane, CAE, National Recreation and Park Association president and CEO

“Whether a family outing, a school trip or a day at camp, time spent outdoors helps kids develop a sense of belonging in nature and an appreciation of the importance of preserving our lands and water. Our national parks and public lands are unrivaled as spaces where kids can connect with nature and grow their love of the outdoors. We applaud the passage of The Every Kid Outdoors Act which will enable youth-serving organizations like the Y to create powerful community partnerships focused on ensuring all kids, regardless of their circumstances, can experience the wonder of these national treasures.” – Kevin Washington, President and CEO, YMCA of the USA

“We are so pleased that the House of Representatives has approved the Every Kid Outdoors Act which will make Every Kid in a Park a permanent program. In its almost three years of existence, this program had opened the door to the natural beauty of the nation’s parks for countless children, helping them to stay physically active and healthy. With the passage of this legislation, the admirable work of this wonderful public-private partnership can continue and provide opportunities for many more kids to savor the great outdoors through our national parks and public lands.” – Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association

“The Trust for Public Land, which creates parks and protects land for people, is grateful for Congress’ support of this vital program, which provides children the opportunity to experience our national treasures, often for the first time. Efforts like the Every Kid Outdoors Act to connect children with nature are critical to ensuring that the next generation will have access to parks and green spaces within a 10-minute walk of home.” – Kathy DeCoster, Vice President and Director of Federal Affairs, The Trust for Public Land

“Every kid should have access to the physical, emotional and social health benefits of getting outdoors – but today’s kids spend more time indoors than any generation in history. With the passage of the Every Kid in a Park Act, we can begin to overcome some of the structural barriers that keep kids from low-income families and communities of color from having access to outdoor play.  We applaud Congress for its bipartisan leadership on this issue and encourage the U.S. Senate to join their colleagues in the House to ensure this program for generations to come.” – Jackie Ostfeld, Outdoors Director for Sierra Club and Founder and Chair of the Outdoors Alliance for Kids.

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About the Outdoors Alliance for Kids (OAK): OAK is a national strategic partnership of organizations from diverse sectors with a common interest in connecting children, youth, and families with the outdoors. The members of OAK are brought together by the belief that the wellness of current and future generations, the health of our planet and communities, and the economy of the future depend on humans having a personal, direct, and life-long relationship with nature and the outdoors. OAK brings together nearly 100 businesses and organizations, representing more than 60 million individuals to address the growing divide between children, youth, and the natural world. For more information: www.outdoorsallianceforkids.org

 

Release: Congress Acts to Protect Access to Parks for Kids and Families

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Contact:   April Thomas, 206.321.3850, contact@outdoorsallianceforkids.org

Congress Acts to Protect Access to Parks for Kids and Families

Legislation encourages fourth graders to visit national parks and public lands

Washington, D.C.– Today, the Every Kid Outdoors Act passed out of the House Natural Resources Committee with unanimous, bipartisan approval. The Every Kid Outdoors Act would continue an existing program that ensures every fourth grade student in the U.S. has access and encouragement to visit national parks and public lands. The future of this program is uncertain and may end this year unless Congress acts to authorize it past 2018.

Outdoors Alliance for Kids (OAK) Steering Committee Members issued the following statements:

“Every kid should have access to our national parks,” said Jackie Ostfeld, Director of Sierra Club Outdoors and Chair of OAK. “Today’s kids are spending less time outdoors than any generation in history. We need the Every Kid Outdoors Act to maintain our kids’ connection with nature, and to protect public health. Thank you to the House Natural Resources Committee for moving this legislation forward and making sure access and opportunities to play, learn, and work on our public lands are prioritized with so much else going on in Washington. With your continued support, we will pass the Every Kid Outdoors Act and ensure access to our national parks for the next generation.”

“Whether a family outing, a school trip or a day at camp, time spent outdoors helps kids develop a sense of belonging in nature and an appreciation of the importance of preserving our lands and water. Our national parks and public lands are unrivaled as spaces where kids can connect with nature and grow their love of the outdoors. The Every Kid Outdoors Act will enable youth-serving organizations like the Y to create powerful community partnerships focused on ensuring all kids, regardless of their circumstances, can experience the wonder of these national treasures,” said Kevin Washington, President and CEO, YMCA of the USA.

“Connecting young people to our National Parks and other public lands is a great way to ensure that kids are active, healthy, and happy,” said Paul Sanford, National Director of Recreation Policy, The Wilderness Society and Vice Chair of OAK. “We need to do everything we can to connect kids to the great outdoors. The Every Kid Outdoors Act is a key component of OAK’s comprehensive strategy for getting kids outside. The Wilderness Society applauds the House Natural Resources Committee for moving this bill forward.”

“Through our national Buddy Bison School Program, we have seen first hand the many benefits of the 4th grade federal park pass that would be continued through the Every Kid Outdoors Act. The pass has been an effective way to engage students and families across the country with our public lands and waters, many for the very first time,” stated, Grace Lee, Executive Director, National Park Trust.

“Parks play a critical role in teaching our nation’s youth about conservation and the importance of the outdoors,” said Barbara Tulipane, CAE, National Recreation and Park Association president and CEO. “Thank you to Congress for taking the first step to ensure every kid has access to our nation’s parks and the benefits they provide.”

“Alliance for Childhood is enthusiastic about the opportunities the Every Kid Outdoors Act will provide for fourth graders and their families. Together with our partners at Outdoors Alliance for Kids, we look forward to working with federal agencies to ensure all children’s healthy development, especially through outdoor, child-initiated play in our natural world,” said Linda Rhoads, Executive Director, Alliance for Childhood.

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BACKGROUND:

The existing Every Kid in a Park program is a low-cost and popular public-private partnership that helps boost local economies while improving our children’s health and connections to nature. In the program’s first year, more than two million fourth graders downloaded the Every Kid pass. Over the first two years, nearly $5 million in private funding has been leveraged to support transportation costs for children from low-income schools across the United States.

About the Outdoors Alliance for Kids (OAK): OAK is a national strategic partnership of organizations from diverse sectors with a common interest in connecting children, youth and families with the outdoors. The members of OAK are brought together by the belief that the wellness of current and future generations, the health of our planet and communities and the economy of the future depend on humans having a personal, direct and life-long relationship with nature and the outdoors. OAK brings together nearly 100 businesses and organizations, representing more than 60 million individuals to address the growing divide between children, youth and the natural world. For more information: www.outdoorsallianceforkids.org

Every Kid in a Park Youth Blog Series: Post #8 Tigran

Junior Ranger Tigran with Buddy Bison
Photo Credit: National Park Trust

Every Kid in a Park – Youth Blog Series, Post #8
Interview with Tigran, Buddy Bison Student Ambassador

Meet Tigran, a twelve year old* from California. Tigran serves as a Buddy Bison Student Ambassador through the National Park Trust and is a true advocate for getting other kids in the outdoors! His incredible involvement has earned him the Gold President’s Volunteer Service Award. Tigran shares with us his experience at multiple parks and the importance of getting more kids like him to become park stewards.

What is your name, age, and where are you from?

Tigran: Tigran, age 12, from Ojai, California.

What do you love about the outdoors?

Tigran: The outdoors has amazing beauty and abundant wildlife. The outdoors allows people to relax and explore amazing places that no photo can truly capture.

What is your happiest memory in the outdoors?

Tigran: My happiest outdoor memory is exploring Santa Cruz Island with my family and seeing my very first island fox. I was able to spend some time watching it and I took lots of pictures.

What is your role with National Park Trust?

Tigran: I am the first student Buddy Bison Ambassador. I write for the Buddy Bison’s Buzz newsletter and I post on Instagram and Twitter (@jrrangertigran).

As an ambassador, I encourage children to take Buddy Bison on outdoor adventures with them. I get to help out at special events and hand out Buddy Bison stuffed animals, t-shirts, and Every Kid in a Park passes.  

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Photo Credit: National Park Trust

What do you love the most about being a student Buddy Bison Ambassador?

Tigran: My favorite part about being an ambassador is motivating kids to get outdoors, be active and healthy, and explore our beautiful national parks.

Can you talk about one of your biggest volunteer projects you’ve helped organize or been a part of? Why did you enjoy it so much?

Tigran: My longest volunteer project was the National Park Service Centennial Challenge. The challenge was to volunteer for 201.6 hours in 2016. I started the first of the year by kicking off the Rose Parade in Pasadena. I volunteered many days at the Channel Islands National Park visitor center and worked at  many special events: coastal cleanups, native island plant sales, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area Bird Festival, NPS events at the Museum of Ventura County, Junior Ranger Day, Backbone Trail dedication, Ventura County Fair’s Channel Islands National Park booth, Parade of Lights, Tomatomania, Earth Day,  BioBlitz, Kids to Parks Day, and NEEF Hands on the Land island restoration projects. I also became a youth board member of Channel Islands Park Foundation. I am proud to say that I exceeded the challenge and I was honored to receive the Gold President’s Volunteer Service Award, which is the highest honor the President awards a volunteer (other than the Lifetime Achievement Award—I’m a little young for that!).

I enjoyed the variety of events I was able to assist with but my favorite part was when I was able to combine my roles to help bring children to the park. National Park Trust and Channel Islands Park Foundation partnered to bring 4th graders to Anacapa Island in support of Every Kid in a Park to meet Dr. Sylvia Earle for the celebration of BioBlitz and Kids to Parks Day. They all had a great time and each student received their Every Kid in a Park pass and earned their junior ranger badges.

What is one of your favorite parks you’ve visited and why? Who did you go with?

Tigran: This is a very hard question because all of the national parks are unique in their own ways. But Channel Islands National Park is special to me because I earned my first junior ranger badge there when I was five. It is an amazing park because of the diversity of wildlife on land and in the sea. I first experienced the Park with my parents and now my parents and I are all volunteers for Channel Islands National Park and the Channel Islands Park Foundation.

Why do you think it’s important for kids and families to spend time outdoors?

Tigran: It’s good to spend time outdoors with your family because it builds wonderful memories and teaches important lessons and skills such as perseverance by completing long hikes, and it teaches us to be more aware of the environment and the importance of protecting our incredible parks for future generations.

Have you heard about the Every Kid in a Park program? If so, were you able to participate? Why or why not?

Tigran: Yes, I love the Every Kid in a Park program. Unfortunately, I was one year too old to participate in the program. However, I have helped promote the program on social media. Every Kid in a Park used my photograph to promote the program in Scholastic Magazine, and I am happy to say that the entire fourth grade class at my school participated in the program.

Do you think this program is important to continue for future generations?

Tigran: Yes, it’s important to continue the program because it gets kids involved with nature when they are young, yet old enough to get the full educational experience of our beautiful parks.

Is there anything you’d like to say to the people who run the program?

Tigran: I would like to say thank you for creating the program. It helps kids to have easier access to our national treasures. It gives the opportunity to participate in the junior ranger programs and become park stewards. I would not have become a Buddy Bison Student Ambassador, a National Park volunteer or a Channel Islands Park Foundation Board Member without the junior ranger program.

What advice would you give to other students who are perhaps visiting a national park for the first time or receiving their Every Kid in a Park pass?

Tigran: First of all, take your time to look around to get the most out of your visit. A great way to do that is to earn your junior ranger badge, which will help guide your activities in the park. Be sure to talk to rangers—they can often share stories that you can’t find at the visitor center. They each have such incredible knowledge of our parks. Just head outdoors and make the most of your special pass.

What would you want to be when you grow up? Is it related to the outdoors?

Tigran: My ultimate goal is to be the Director of the National Park Service. It would be an honor to direct the preservation and protection of our beautiful and unique national parks.

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Photo Credit: National Park Trust
august-2016
Photo Credit: National Park Trust, Maddie Freed

*Since the posting of this blog, Tigran has now turned 13! Happy birthday, Tigran!

Fourth Graders Float into OAK Week 2017

Parent and two kids canoeing along the Potomac River
Photo Credit: National Park Trust

All photo credits go to the National Park Trust.

Classrooms on water is a new way of learning for students across the nation. This new type of classroom allows students to learn about science, history, geography, and culture while floating along a river. This past week, Wilderness Inquiry’s Canoemobile program traveled to the nation’s capital giving students in Washington D.C. the chance to experience a unique outdoor field trip on the Potomac River.

The National Park Service advocates for “Parks as Classrooms,” and it’s no different when talking about rivers and bodies of water. Canoemobile brings the classroom to the outdoors, engaging youth in environmental stewardship and recreational opportunities. Canoemobile is a collaboration of federal, state, and local partners.

OAK members joined Wilderness Inquiry and National Park Trust for a special Canoemobile event in Washington, D.C. with partners The North Face, National Park Service, and the U.S. Forest Service to celebrate the Every Kid in a Park program and kick off OAK’s annual gathering.

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A highlight in the event was the distribution of Every Kid in a Park passes. This interagency program grants fourth graders nationwide free entry for them and their families to more than 2,000 federally managed lands and waters nationwide for an entire year.  The goal of the Every Kid in a Park program is to inspire fourth graders everywhere to visit our federal lands and waters. The program works to ensure “every child” in the U.S. has the opportunity to visit and enjoy their federal lands and waters by the time he or she is 11 years old. Having just been renewed for its third year this past September, the passes given to these students will be valid until August 31, 2018.

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Seventy fourth graders from D.C. public schools were able to take 24-foot Voyageur canoes along the Potomac river and learn about the watershed. For many of these students, although the Potomac river is just a few miles away, they have never actually been on the river to participate recreationally. With the proper instruction, the fourth graders were able to safely enjoy the Potomac River and learn about its environmental importance.

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Partnering organizations led activity stations for the students. The North Face led students through a relay race activity which taught students how to properly pack a backpack and build a tent for a camping trip. With a little competition and movement, students were able to stay engaged and learn new skills about recreating in the outdoors.

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As a wrap up to the morning of events, the fourth graders were asked to fill out postcards from OAK explaining why they love their Every Kid in a Park pass. This initiative is part of a larger national campaign OAK is organizing for any fourth grader in the nation. To download and mail in postcard from home, visit the OAK website.

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Even WTOP, a local FM radio station, stopped by to cover the event! Read their story.

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This youth event kicked off this year’s official OAK Week. Later in the afternoon, OAK formally welcomed all member organizations with a Welcome Reception & Member Awards. In the next two days, OAK continued with its Annual Member Meeting, Networking Happy Hour, Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill, and finalized the week with a Congressional Awards Reception.

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Learn more about the Outdoors Alliance for Kids and ways to joining this national strategic partnership which advocates for equitable and readily available opportunities for children, youth and families to connect with the outdoors.

Every Kid in a Park Youth Blog Series: Noam (Seattle Every Kid in a Park Collaborative)

Noam Hiking in Glacier National Park

EVERY KID IN A PARK: Youth Blog Series, Post #6
Interview with Noam, a former Every Kid in a Park pass user, and participant through the Seattle Every Kid in a Park Collaborative.

Noam D.  is about to start 5th grade at Highland Park Elementary School in Seattle. He is originally from California where he was actually born in a National Park Service site – Golden Gate National Recreation Area!

Can you introduce yourself?

Noam: I’m Noam and I’m 10 years old. I’m about to start 5th grade. I was born in California but now I live in Seattle.

How did you get your Every Kid in a Park Pass?

Noam: We were going to get it at school but I got it online first because my dad knew about the Seattle Every Kid in a Park Collaborative. I was really happy when I learned about it.

What parks did you visit and with whom?

Noam: I went to Rainier with my dad, two friends, and their dad; Yellowstone and Glacier with my dad; Olympic with my mom, dad, sister, and grandmother; and Billy Frank Jr. National Wildlife Refuge with my mom, dad, and sister.

Which park was your favorite?

Noam: Yellowstone!

Why was it your favorite?

Noam: It had really cool sunsets, lots of mountains, and lots of wildlife that you would rarely see like bears and wolves, yellow-bellied marmots, elk and bison.

Was it your first time visiting any of these sites?

Noam: Yes, it was my first time visiting Yellowstone, Glacier, and Billy Franky Jr.

What did you do at Yellowstone?

Noam: We looked for wolves, got hailed and rained on, and went on hikes!

Was this your first time visiting Yellowstone?

Noam: Yes

Would you like to go back to Yellowstone?

Noam: Yes, I’d like to go back to Yellowstone with my mom and sister because I think they’d be really interested in all the cool animals and sites.

What’s your favorite activity to do outdoors?

Noam: I like to go on hikes, explore, and look for animals.

Why do you like to go to parks?

Noam: It’s much cleaner than cities and towns. There’s more wildlife that you can see. And you can experience a better world.

Why do you think it’s important for kids to go outside and visit parks like the ones you were able to visit?

Noam: It’s a good opportunity to discover new things that’s a lot better than cities and towns. It’s a lot cooler!

What is your favorite memory from a national park?

Noam: Seeing a pack of wolves in Yellowstone!

Are you happy you received an Every Kid in a Park pass?

Noam: Yes – very happy.

What advice would you have for future 4th graders getting their pass this year?

Noam: It’s very important to pay more attention to the animals and the scenes. You’re in a really cool park that is sometimes hard to see when there’s a lot of people there.

Is there anything else you’d like to say?

Noam: Thank all you guys for letting me get the pass. I got to experience things I’ve wanted to since I was 3 or 4 years old.

Sam and Noam near Yellowstone Falls in Yellowstone National Park.
Sam and Noam near Yellowstone Falls in Yellowstone National Park.

The Seattle Every Kid in a Park Collaborative brings together nonprofits and federal land management agencies serving the Puget Sound region to develop strategies to ensure all fourth grade students in the area (and their families) have opportunities to visit public lands and parks through the Every Kid in a Park initiative. Collaborative members include: The National Park Service, IslandWood, The National Forest Service, NatureBridge, YMCA Bold and Gold, The Washington Trails Association, Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Seattle Audubon Society.

For more information visit: www.ekipseattle.org.


This is the sixth post in a youth blog series highlighting students’ experiences through the Every Kid in a Park program, and those with similar first-time outdoor experiences.

EVERY KID IN A PARK: YOUTH BLOG SERIES POST #5 Nicole

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Every Kid in a Park – Youth Blog Series, Post #5
Interview with Nicole, incoming 4th grader and Every Kid in a Park pass recipient

Nicole is an incoming 4th grader at Harmony Hills Elementary School in Montgomery County, Maryland. Interviewer, Isabel Argoti, introduced Nicole and her family to the Every Kid in a Park program and they are excited to participate in the program this school year. Nicole shares with us her excitement about the outdoors and her sentiments about the program.

What is your name, age, and where are you from?
Nicole: My name is Nicole. I’m 9 years old and will be attending Harmony Hills Elementary School.

What do you love about the outdoors and nature? What do you like to do outdoors?
Nicole: I like all the colorful plants that are around me and how beautiful nature is. I like to take a short walk with my dogs and playing basketball with my mom when we have free time.

Have you visited Rock Creek Park or some of the other national parks or monuments around Washington D.C.? If so, what did you like about them?
Nicole: I went to the Martin Luther King Jr. monument it was so cool because it was my first time seeing it.

What about to parks such as Shenandoah National Park? (shows photos)
Nicole: No I haven’t.

Well did you know that with your Every Kid in a Park pass you could visit these sites plus hundreds of others, with your Every Kid in a Park pass for free this upcoming school year? How does that make you feel?
Nicole: Excited and happy because I get to see and experience a place I’ve never seen or been to.

That’s great! Who do you think you will go visit these parks with?
Nicole: I will be visiting with my family –parents and sisters.

What does being in the outdoors and enjoying nature mean to you?
Nicole: Hanging out with my family and friends. It’s a break and escape from what we usually have to do.

Do you think all kids your age should receive this pass to visit national parks? Why or why not?
Nicole: Yes because everyone needs to know about nature and learn more about it. I also think they should know about the program [because] some kids are always on their phones, video games, and TV.

I totally agree, Nicole! Any last comments or anything you’d like to say about the program?
Nicole: Yes, in my opinion I think the government should support the park [and program]. It helps other kids to learn more about nature. I also think that the government should give more money to the park to keep them clean, nice, and beautiful. And also to have lights everywhere so people can go to the park until night time!


Nicole attends a Title I school where over 80% of the students participate in the Free and Reduced Meals (FARMs) program, over 40% of the students are English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) learners, and 90% of the students are either Hispanic or black. Nicole and her family have never visited large national parks before, but they hope to do so now with Nicole’s new Every Kid in a Park pass. Nicole is a first generation student in the United States and her family is originally from Ecuador.

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RELEASE: The Every Kid in a Park Program Turns Three

For Immediate Release

September 6, 2017

Contact: Jackie Ostfeld, 202-548-6584; contact@outdoorsallianceforkids.org

 

The Every Kid in a Park Program Turns Three

4th graders encouraged to get outdoors; legislation introduced to make program permanent

Washington, D.C.–The third year of the Every Kid in a Park program kicks off this month with the launch of the 2017-18 school year. Through public-private partnerships, the program provides fourth graders and their families with free entry to America’s national public lands, waters, and shores. Children, parents and guardians, and educators can visit www.everykidinapark.gov to learn more and download the new pass.

Earlier this summer, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced the Every Kid Outdoors Act to ensure the program lives on for years to come.

In response, Jackie Ostfeld, Chair of the Outdoors Alliance for Kids, issued the following statement:

“The Every Kid in a Park program is inspiring a new generation to get out and explore America’s great outdoors. At a time when children and youth are increasingly sedentary and disconnected from nature, programs like Every Kid provide entry points for our youth to play, get active, and learn about the outdoors. The program is a low-cost and popular public-private partnership that helps boost local economies while improving our children’s health and connections to nature. In the program’s first year, more than two million fourth graders downloaded the Every Kid pass. Over the first two years, nearly $5 million in private funding has been leveraged to support transportation costs for children from low-income schools across America.

“The Outdoors Alliance for Kids praises the National Park Service, US Forest Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other federal agencies for continuing the program for the 2017-18 school year. To ensure the Every Kid in a Park program continues to encourage and support fourth graders to get outdoors beyond the current school year, OAK seeks passage of the bipartisan and bicameral Every Kid Outdoors Act to formally establish the program for all fourth graders, present and future.”

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About the Outdoors Alliance for Kids (OAK): OAK is a national strategic partnership of organizations from diverse sectors with a common interest in connecting children, youth and families with the outdoors. The members of OAK are brought together by the belief that the wellness of current and future generations, the health of our planet and communities and the economy of the future depend on humans having a personal, direct and life-long relationship with nature and the outdoors. OAK brings together nearly 100 businesses and organizations to address the growing divide between children, youth and the outdoors.

EKIP Postcards
Every Kid in a Park Alumni explain why they love the program
Photo Credit: National Park Trust

EVERY KID IN A PARK – YOUTH BLOG SERIES: POST #2

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Every Kid in a Park – Youth Blog Series, Post #2
Interview with Evie E. & Louise R., former Every Kid in a Park pass users

Evie E. and Louise R. are both rising sixth-graders at Creative Minds International Public Charter School in Washington, D.C. They were both invited to speak at OAK’s Congressional Lunch Briefing on July 11, 2017 to talk about their experiences outdoors. Before the event, they were interviewed by Isabel Argoti, OAK/NPS Community Assistance Fellow, and Katie Brantley, Sierra Club Digital Storytelling Fellow. Evie and Louise’s speeches given during the briefing were recorded live.


What’s your name, age, and grade?

Evie: I’m Evie and I’m 11 going into the sixth grade.

Louise: And I’m Louise, also 11 and also going into the sixth grade.

What do you love about the outdoors and what do you like to do outside?

Evie: Outdoors is peaceful and relaxing, and you can think about stuff. And it helps things grow, which it also helps us grow. Like vegetables.

Louise: I like the feeling of being independent outdoors, where you can just free-roam and explore and discover new plants and insects and animals.

Where did you get your Every Kid in a Park pass?

Louise: We went on a school trip and they handed them out. It was the US Arboretum.

Evie: There was also another school there.

Which parks have you been to?

Evie: Assateague Island National Seashore, Rock Creek Park, and Prince William Forest Park.

Louise: C&O Canal National Historical Park, National Mall, Rock Creek Park which is really close to my house. And Prince William Forest Park.

What did you like to do there? What was your favorite part about your visit?

Evie: At Prince William, we actually went camping there with our class in cabins. And at Rock Creek, I like to go hiking.

Louise: Me, too. Sometimes with my family, we’ll go on a family hike because it’s so close to our house. And sometimes we’ll walk along the C&O Canal and hike along the rocks.

What advice do you have for a future fourth grader who is about to receive their Every Kid in a Park pass?  

Louise: Try to get your parents to have the family travel somewhere far. Also let the pass be a reminder to you to get outdoors even if it’s not a huge national park.

Evie: I have two sisters–one of them had the pass last year and the other is getting the pass this year and so I think my advice would be to look through the book or website when you first get the pass. Try to choose a park that is the farthest away from you so you can go on a long road trip and so you can find stuff that wouldn’t be in a park nearer to you, so you can learn new stuff and discover new, fun, exciting things.

 

The school trips in which Evie and Louise received their passes were sponsored field trips by the National Park Trust. The National Park Trust, a 501(c)(3) non profit, is dedicated to preserving parks today and creating park stewards for tomorrow, and is an incredible supporter of the Every Kid in a Park program. Since 2009,​ the Buddy Bison School Program and national Kids to Parks Day have engaged 3,000,000 students across the country with our nation’s parks, public lands and waters (ParkTrust.org).

 

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EKIP Postcards

This is the second in a series of blogs highlighting students who have used, or are gearing up to use, their Every Kid in a Park pass.

Every Kid Outdoors Twitter Party Roundup

On Friday, July 14th, the Outdoors Alliance for Kids held a Twitter Party to discuss the Every Kid Outdoors Act. The legislation was introduced this week with bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress. Here’s a roundup of our Twitter Party with OAK members and the Congressional sponsors of the bill.

The Every Kid Outdoors Act sponsors have this to say…

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And just why is it so important to get kids outdoors?

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What is the Every Kid Outdoors Act?

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What are some barriers kids face when it comes to connecting with the outdoors?

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How are OAK members stepping up to support the program?

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How does time outdoors impact the health of children?

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How does outdoor time improve learning?

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And there are economic impacts, too, right?

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How can you help get kids outdoors?

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Bonus tweets!

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